c. Lawrence gallery: identity and branding design

 

february 23 - april 1, 2016
academic design projecT

This project was created in order to explore the design of a gallery space with a difficult conceptual theme. The fictional gallery space provided was called the "C. Lawrence Gallery" and was described as "a gallery showcasing the history of electronic music and synthesizer technology". 

This project was a personal challenge because of my unfamiliarity with the topic, and my eventual experimental style of composition in which I executed the project. My finished designs are based off of the experimental notation style of the musician John Cage, who was an early pioneer in composing for electronic music. 

Scroll to view the complete journey from start to finish -- or skip to the bottom of this page to see the finished designs only.

 

initial logo sketches and moodboard

I initially wanted to steer more towards blues and oranges with pops of color in my designs, but I was guided to use a color palette that was more "neon" and "electric". My logos were also perceived as being too classical for the project. I scrapped most aspects of these initial designs. 

Logos - Initial Sketches

Logos - Initial Sketches

Original Styleguide

Original Styleguide

 

second pass at logos and design direction

This time, I kept neon green as my primary highlight color, and opted for a more "boxy" look. I was still feeling lost in my design direction, and I dove more into researching the history of digital music production.

2nd Pass at Logos

2nd Pass at Logos

Business Card - Back

Business Card - Back

Business Card - Front

Business Card - Front

Business Card - Front and Back

Business Card - Front and Back

Letterhead

Letterhead

 

final designs

My designs ended up stemming from the compositions of John Cage and his style of experimental notation. Cage was a pioneer in electronic music of his era, and his theories of experimental notation were visually stunning as well being as vastly ahead of his time. I based all of the aspects of my gallery off of his notation, mimicking his style and illustrating compositions similar to his music. I also sampled some of his work directly, tracing over some of his work in items such as the business cards. The resulting style was cohesive, experimental, and stayed true to the roots of what the gallery was intended to be.